Project Title: AKCSI Project 11: Bering Sea canyons
Project Summary

In the eastern Bering Sea several hundred miles from shore, the seafloor descends into the abyss. Most of the continental slope makes a gradual descent, but in several places, canyons interrupt the regular topography. The seafloor of the slope is primarily composed of sand, mud, gravel or other coarse materials. In recent years the advancement in technology has allowed us to peer deeper into the depths and study bottom dwelling creatures like corals. Because these species are vulnerable to fishing impacts, resource managers in Alaska were eager for scientists to use this technology to identify areas where corals were concentrated, particularly in relation to two eastern Bering Sea canyons -- Pribilof and Zhemchug. In 2014 a team of NOAA Fisheries scientists to conduct a research survey in the eastern Bering Sea. The team collected 225,000 (3-D) video images of the seafloor, the continental slope, and several underwater canyons at depths of around 300 feet to just over 2,600 feet. The study area spanned depths where a lot of the fishing activity takes place.

The final report for this survey is published as a NOAA Tech Memo: Results of the 2014 Underwater Camera Survey of the Eastern Bering Slope and Outer Shelf.

Anticipated Management Application(s)  None Defined
Location(s):
  •  None Defined.
Point of Contact: Office of the Point of Contact:
  • NMFS AFSC
Project Title: AKCSI Project 11: Bering Sea canyons
Methods/Approach  None Defined
Project Results and Management Outcomes

The final report for this survey is published as a NOAA Tech Memo: Results of the 2014 Underwater Camera Survey of the Eastern Bering Slope and Outer Shelf.

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